Euro Surveill. 2016 May 26;21(21). doi: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.21.30239.

Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic non-susceptibility of invasive and non-invasiveStreptococcus pneumoniae, Switzerland, 2004 to 2014.

Hauser C1, Kronenberg A, Allemann A, Mühlemann K, Hilty M.

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Abstract

Concurrent analysis of antibiotic resistance of colonising and invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae gives a more accurate picture than looking at either of them separately. Therefore, we analysed 2,129 non-invasive and 10,996 invasive pneumococcal isolates from Switzerland from 2004 to 2014, which spans the time before and after the introduction of the heptavalent (PCV7) and 13-valent (PCV13) conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines. Serotype/serogroup information was linked with all antibiotic resistance profiles. During the study period, the proportion of non-susceptible non-invasive and invasive isolates significantly decreased for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). This was most apparent in non-invasive isolates from study subjects younger than five years (penicillin (p = 0.006), erythromycin (p = 0.01) and TMP-SMX (p = 0.002)). Resistant serotypes/serogroups included in PCV7 and/or PCV13 decreased and were replaced by non-PCV13 serotypes (6C and 15B/C). Serotype/serogroup-specific antibiotic resistance rates were comparable between invasive and non-invasive isolates. Adjusted odds ratios of serotype/serogroup-specific penicillin resistance were significantly higher in the west of Switzerland for serotype 6B (1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-4.8), 9V (3.4; 95% CI: 2.0-5.7), 14 (5.3; 95% CI: 3.8-7.5), 19A (2.2; 95% CI: 1.6-3.1) and 19F (3.1; 95% CI: 2.1-4.6), probably due to variations in the antibiotic consumption.

KEYWORDS:

Streptococcus pneumoniae; antibiotic resistance; epidemiology; invasive pneumococcal disease; serotype; surveillance

PMID: 27254535 [PubMed - in process]